SW Cancer Services

Screening & Testing

Radiographer – a highly trained and skilled person who works in a radiology clinic and whose duties include positioning patients for radiologic examinations; determining the technical aspects of each radiograph and adjusting the x-ray equipment; the production of radiographs as requested; developing the x-ray film; and assisting the radiologist (a doctor) in special procedures.

Radiologist – a doctor who has undertaken speciality training in the reading and interpretation of x-rays and other medical images.

Radiology – the branch of medicine that deals with diagnosis of disease through the use of electromagnetic radiation or sound waves and that treats disease through the use of radioactive compounds. Radiologic imaging techniques include x-rays, CAT scans, PET scans, MRIs, and ultrasonograms.

Pathology – the medical specialty concerned with the study of the nature and causes of diseases. It underpins every aspect of medicine, from diagnostic testing and monitoring of chronic diseases to cutting-edge genetic research and blood transfusion technologies. Pathology is integral to the diagnosis of every cancer.

Pathologist – a doctor who has specialised in pathology by undertaking several years of specialised study after graduating as a doctor.  These doctors function in the laboratory, examining biopsy specimens, and regulating studies performed by the hospital laboratories (blood tests, urine tests, etc).  This speciality training will be recognised by a College such as the Royal College of Pathologists Australasia and the pathologist will be a fellow of the College (FRCPA) or its overseas equivalent.

Haematology – an area of medicine which deals with many aspects of those diseases which affect the blood such as anaemia, leukemia, lymphoma, and clotting or bleeding disorders.

Haematologist – a doctor who has specialised in the treatment of patients with haematological disorders. A haematologist will have a medical qualification (e.g. MBBS) after which he/she will have undertaken speciality training in oncology for several years. This speciality training will be recognised by a College such as the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the haematologist will be a fellow of the College (FRACP) or its overseas equivalent.