SW Cancer Services

Specialists

Surgeon – A doctor who has specialised in performing surgical procedures to treat disease, injury, or deformity by operative or manual methods. A surgeon may operate to remove an organ or a tumour. Surgeons may specialise in a particular type of surgery, eg breast surgery. A specialist surgeon may be a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (FRACS) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Surgeon.

Medical Oncologist – a doctor who has specialised in the treatment of cancer with medicine, for example treatment with chemotherapy. A medical oncologist will have a medical qualification after which he/she will have undertaken speciality training in oncology for several years. This speciality training will be recognised by a College such as the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the medical oncologist will be a fellow of the College (FRACP) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Medical Oncologist.

Radiation Oncology – also called radiotherapy is the use of high-energy rays to destroy cancer cells and stop them from growing and dividing. Like surgery, radiation oncology is essentially a local treatment; it affects cancer cells only in the treated area. Radiation can come from a machine (external radiation). It can also come from an implant (a small container of radioactive material) placed directly into or near the tumor (internal radiation). Some patients receive both kinds of radiation therapy.

Radiation Oncologist – a doctor who has specialised in radiotherapy. A radiation oncologist will have a medical qualification (e.g. MBBS) after which he/she will have undertaken speciality training in radiotherapy for several years. This speciality training will be recognised by a College such as the Royal Australian & New Zealand College of Radiologists and the radiotherapist will be a fellow of the College (FRANZCR) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Radiation Oncologist.

Palliative Care – palliative care is care provided for people of all ages who have a life limiting illness, with little or no prospect of cure, and for whom the primary treatment goal is quality of life. Palliative medicine utilises a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, relying on input from physicians, pharmacists, nurses, chaplains, social workers, psychologists, and other allied health professionals in formulating a plan of care to relieve suffering in all areas of a patient’s life. This multidisciplinary approach allows the palliative care team to address physical, emotional, spiritual, and social concerns that arise with advanced illness.

Palliative Care Specialist – a doctor who has specialised in palliative care. A palliative care specialist will have a medical qualification after which he/she will have undertaken speciality training in palliative care. This speciality training will be recognised by a College such as the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the Palliative Care Specialist will be a fellow of the College (FRACP) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Palliative Care Specialist.

Respiratory Physician – a doctor who has specialised in diseases of the chest, particularly the lungs. A respiratory physician will have a medical qualification after which he/she will have undertaken specialty training in respiratory medicine. This speciality training will be recognised by the Royal Australian College of Physicians and the respiratory physician will be a fellow of the College (FRACP) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Respiratory Physician.

Gynaecologist – a doctor who has specialised in the diseases of women, especially of the reproductive organs. A gynaecologist may be involved in the diagnosis, and surgical treatment of women with cancer of the uterus (womb) and/or ovaries. A specialist gynaecologist may also be a specialised surgeon and a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (FRACS) or its overseas equivalent. Find a Gynaecologist.